THE PHILIPPINES AFTER TYPHOON YOLANDA- PART 1

Journeys in Medicine

Part I – Arrival

Three years of waiting have come to an end. It was in november 2010 that I started my Red Cross training and I have been a delegate, ready to be deployed as a surgeon for two and a half years. I have completed online courses, have lived through seven days of a simulated mission in the woods of Eidene, Norway, where we built up a field hospital and trained the practical aspects of being on a mission (ERU course). I have done the IMPACT course, another seven days of learning about the Red Cross movement, its structures and its goals and purpose. I was ready! Very, very ready to be deployed. But then, instead, came the long void: Luckily for planet earth, major disasters which would warrant deployment of a field hospital, just didn’t seem to happen anymore. ‘Well, great!’ the humanitarian in me thought and…

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‘Prostate cancer test has been misused for money’ Claims Pathologist Richard Ablin who discovered the PSA antigen 40 years ago

An interesting angle on the subject.

ClinicalNews.Org

"Many men get treated unnecessarily – and risk life-altering side effects including impotence and incontinence"
“Many men get treated unnecessarily – and risk life-altering side effects including impotence and incontinence”

Pathologist Richard Ablin discovered the PSA antigen 40 years ago. He says it should never have been used as a cancer screening tool for all men

Your book condemns the use of PSA for cancer screening. What do you hope to accomplish? I hope to expose how the urology community and drug industry misused the PSA test, putting money over the best interests of patients. I also want to show how the US Food and Drug Administration failed in its duty to the public: its advisers warned that routine PSA screening would cause a public health disaster, but it was approved under pressure from advocacy groups and drug companies.

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THE PHILIPPINES AFTER YOLANDA – PART 3

Part 3 (link to part 1 and part 2) After the first ten days I feel more at ease. Things that looked exotic and strange to me a week ago seem now familiar. The days pass in a predictable pattern and we don’t get called out at night anymore. We usually set up our surgeries the day before which … Continue reading THE PHILIPPINES AFTER YOLANDA – PART 3

THE PHILIPPINES AFTER YOLANDA – Part 2

Part 2  - Work  (read part 1 here) My first night has been warm and humid. My only cover is a sheet and even that is too warm. My pillow is soaking wet from my sweat. The team before us bought in ventilators with one of these miracle machines placed in each tent and they give … Continue reading THE PHILIPPINES AFTER YOLANDA – Part 2

THE PHILIPPINES AFTER YOLANDA- PART 1

Part I - Arrival Three years of waiting have come to an end. It was in november 2010 that I started my Red Cross training and I have been a delegate, ready to be deployed as a surgeon for two and a half years. I have completed online courses, have lived through seven days of … Continue reading THE PHILIPPINES AFTER YOLANDA- PART 1